Reviews: Auber, Overtures, Vol. IV

Updated: Jul 24

Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra | Naxos


Daniel-François-Esprit Auber was one of the most famous composers of the 19th century, giving definitive form to the uniquely French genres of grand historical opera and opéra-comique. His overtures became famous all over the world for their dancing elegance and fluent melodies, a reflection both of his genial personality and of the Parisian taste and refinement of his day. This programme includes overtures and entr’actes from Auber’s most famous opera about the notorious robber-chief Fra Diavolo, and from one of his least known works, La Fiancée du Roi de Garbe. Volume 2 of this edition (8.574006) was acclaimed as ‘wonderfully articulated and lovingly brought to life’ by MusicWeb International.


From Naxos.com


Under Dario Salvi, the Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra succeeds excellently in the qualities of Auber's music, which range from military throwing to lyrical emphasis to southern vitality and joie de vivre, and to implement his exquisite instrumentation in the most excellent way.

Jan Krobot, Online Merker (original in German)


At the head of a constantly improving orchestra, Dario Salvi knows how to revive these delicious pages too unjustly forgotten, respecting the different eras of the composer.

Jean Michel Pennetier, Forum Opera (original in French)


The interpretations are impeccable.

Remy Frank, Pizzicato


Once again, an enrichment of the discography and a must-buy for every friend of opera-comique and grand opéra. Tonally excellent.

Daniel Hauser, Opera Lounge (original in Dutch)


It is a delightful listen — for me, the highlight of the whole disc — very well played and interpreted by musicians who have a clear grasp of the myriad musical influences.

The Light Music Society on "La Fête de Versailles"


Salvi has immersed himself into Auber's music — and not just his operas. That deep understanding, I think, gives these performances an added lift... The Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra under Salvi's direction has a tight, clear sound. It can be light and transparent as the music requires. But the orchestra can also deliver when darker, more dramatic sounds are needed.

Ralph Graves, Charlottesville Classical



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