RESEARCH

Dario Salvi is one of the leading figures in researching and reviving lost works, particularly in the world of Viennese operetta and ballet.

Dario Salvi is a conductor with a special interest in finding forgotten Viennese operas, operettas and ballets and cleaning the musical score and parts ready for use on the modern stage, along with original images, reviews and pertinent information about past performances. To date, these have included:

Genée Freund Felix, music by Richard Genée, libretto by Louis Herrmann

Genée Der Seekadet (The Sea Cadet), music by Richard Genée, libretto by Richard Genée and Karl Haffner

Meyerbeer Das Brandenburger Tor (The Brandenburg Gate), music by Giacomo Meyerbeer, libretto by Johann Emanuel Veith

Meyerbeer Romilda e Costanza (Romilda and Constance), music by Giacomo Meyerbeer, libretto by Gaetano Rossi

Meyerbeer Jephta's Gelübde  (Jeptha's Vow), music by Giacomo Meyerbeer, libretto by Aloys Shreiber

Meyerbeer Wirth und Gast  (oder Alimelek, oder Die beiden Kalifen), music by Giacomo Meyerbeer, libretto by Johann Gottfried Wöhlbruch

Rumshinsky Dos Tsubrokhene Fidele (The Broken Violin), music by Joseph Rumshinsky, libretto Boris Thomashefsky

Suppé Die Afrikareise (A Trip to Africa), music by Franz von Suppé, libretto by Mauritz West

J. Strauss II Blindekuh (Blind Man’s Bluff), music by Johann Strauss II, libretto by Rudolf Kneisel

J. Strauss II Waldmeister (Woodruff), music by Johann Strauss II, libretto by Gustav Davis

I.Bronsart Jery und Bätely, music by Ingeborg von Bronsart, libretto by Goethe

L.Minkus La Bayadere (ballet)

Find out more about Dario’s research on the Operetta Research Center website

PUBLICATIONS

Since 2016, Dario Salvi has published several books on operetta with Cambridge Scholars.

A TRIP TO AFRICA

Die Afrikareise - A Comic Opera
by Franz von Suppé

In 1883, three of the masterminds of Viennese operetta collaborated on a new masterpiece; A Trip to Africa – or Die Afrikareise in the original German. They were composer Franz von Suppé and librettists Richard Genée and Moritz West. The final result was one of the best Viennese operettas of all time. The work was performed across the world for 50 years, before the advent of films and lighter musical theatre made it, and many other works belonging to the same tradition, obsolete. The last known performance was in Italy in 1922.

Using sources from all over the world, this book pieces together for the first time a complete libretto, in English, German and Italian, with the original stage directions, as well as images of some of the productions. The story is full of humour, romance and suspense, with catchy melodies in a quintessentially Viennese style.

RICHARD GENÉE'S
THE ROYAL MIDDY

Der Seekadett

In 1876, Richard Genée, the busiest and arguably best Viennese operetta librettist collaborated, this time as a composer, with Camillo Walzel on a new masterpiece; Der Seekadett. The final result was one of the best Viennese operettas of all time. The work was performed across the world for 80 years, before the advent of films and lighter musical theatre made it, and many other works belonging to the same tradition, obsolete.

Using sources from all over the world, this book pieces together a complete libretto, in English, German, French and Italian, for the first time in a single volume. The story is full of humour and romance, featuring a deadly duel and a chess game with live figures, with catchy melodies in a quintessentially Viennese style.

THE PRACTICALITIES OF PRODUCING THE PLAY MOZART

with Music by Franz von Suppé

In 1854, the originator of Viennese Operetta, Franz von Suppé created the music for a new play by Leonhart Wohlmuth. It is part of a forgotten art form where the music underlines and accompanies the action on stage in a similar way to a soundtrack for a film. While the music works very well in the present day, the real challenge is to modernise the script to make it relevant and interesting for a modern audience.

Originally written in early 19th century German, the script sounds outdated and received a less than positive reception at its original outing. Its dialogue is more in keeping with Opera and required significant work to make it palatable to a contemporary audience. The project on which this book is based maintained the music by Suppé as indicated in the manuscript score, while translating and adapting the German script by Wohlmuth into a version more interesting in the present day.

 

© 2020 Dario Salvi